(PbF Game) Party Politics: Rules

A game of politics.

(PbF Game) Party Politics: Rules

Postby rick.leeds » 07 May 2015, 17:07

Introduction
Each player runs a political party, not as the party leader but as the grandees behind the party - the people who set the party's policies. The party can be a national party or a provincial party.

At the outset of the game, national parties stand for election in all seven provinces - Arpia, Briorty, Dernia, Fav, Pegard, Severish and Tirsch. They aim to keep maintain the unity of the state.

Provincial parties stand for election in just one of the provinces. They are all independence parties, seeking to create new states by dividing them from the unity.

Players manage their parties and attempt to achieve the constitutional aims of their party.

The Parties
There are 12 different parties, each with a different constitutional aim.

There are 4 'unity' parties, that seek to create a strong, centrist state. Provincial government cannot
Monarchy Party
Constitutional type: Monarchy.
Head of State: The monarch.
Head of Government: The monarch; executive power in the Council of State, lead by a Prime Minister chosen by the monarch (effectively the leader of the largest party in the Senate).
Legislature: Bicameral parliamentary monarchy (the National Assembly) - Senate elected by modified FPTP (first-past-the-post) [PM from here] and Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation).
Legislative power: The monarch - accepts laws voted by National Assembly.

Conservative Party
Constitutional type: Constitutional monarchy; monarch has nominal constitutional powers.
Head of State: The monarch.
Head of Government: Chancellor - directly elected. Heads a Secretariat.
Legislature: Bicameral parliamentary system (the National Assembly) - Senate elected by modified FPTP (first-past-the-post) and Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation).
Legislative power: The monarch - accepts laws voted by the National Assembly.

Republican Party
Constitutional type: Presidential unity.
Head of State: The President - directly elected.
Head of Government: The President - heads an Executive Council.
Legislature: Bicameral system (the National Assembly) - Senate elected by modified FPTP (first-past-the-post) and Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation).
Legislative power: The National Assembly.

National Party
Constitutional type: Parliamentary system
Head of State: The President - directly elected with nominal powers.
Head of Government: Chancellor - directly elected, heads a Secretariat.
Legislature: Bicameral system (the National Assembly) - Senate elected by modified FPTP (first-past-the-post) and Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation).
Legislative power: The President - accepts laws voted by the National Assembly.

There are 4 'federal parties, which seek to create a central government with self-determination in the provinces.
Federal Party
Constitutional type: Presidential system.
Head of State: The President, directly elected.
Head of Government: President, heads an Executive Committee.
Legislature: Bicameral system (the Congress) - Senate elected by modified FPTP (first-past-the-post) and Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation).
Legislative power: The Congress, except for constitutional change which must be accompanied by a plebiscite.

Liberal Party
Constitutional type: Parliamentary system.
Head of State: The President, directly elected with nominal powers.
Head of Government: Prime Minister, chosen by the president (effectively the leader of the largest party in the Senate).
Legislature: Bicameral system (the Congress) - Senate elected by modified FPTP (first-past-the-post) [PM from here] and Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation).
Legislative power: The president.

Democratic Party
Constitutional type: Democratic system.
Head of State: The President, directly elected with nominal powers.
Head of Government: Chancellor, directly elected.
Legislature: Bicameral system (the Congress) - Senate elected by modified FPTP (first-past-the-post) and Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation).
Legislative power: The People - any legislation has to be passed by plebiscite.

Commonwealth Party
Constitutional type: Devolved democratic system.
Head of State: Chancellor, directly elected with nominal powers.
Head of Government: The chancellor.
Legislature: Bicameral system (the Congress) - Senate elected by modified FPTP (first-past-the-post) and Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation).
Legislative power: The People - any legislation has to be passed by plebiscite. Provinces can pass any legislation the want except constitutional legislation.

There are 4 'confederate' parties, with limited centralised power and power more devolved to the provinces.
Legitimist Party
Constitutional type: Presidential system.
Head of State: President, directly elected with nominal powers.
Head of Government: The president.
Legislature: Bicameral system (the Convention) - Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation) and the Chamber of Delegates, selected by Provincial Assemblies. Provincial Assemblies are elected by modified FPTP.
Legislative power: The Convention. Provinces can pass any legislation the want.

Confederate Party
Constitutional type: Presidential system.
Head of State: President, elected by delegates from each Province.
Head of Government: The president.
Legislature: Bicameral system (the Convention) - National Assembly elected by modified FPTP and Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation).
Legislative power: The Convention. Provinces can pass any legislation the want.

Congress Party
Constitutional type: Parliamentary system.
Head of State: President, elected by delegates from each Province.
Head of Government: Chancellor, directly elected.
Legislature: Bicameral system (the Convention) - Chamber of Deputies elected by PR (proportional representation) and the Chamber of Delegates, selected by Provincial Assemblies. Provincial Assemblies are elected by modified FPTP.
Legislative power: The Convention. Provinces can pass any legislation the want.

Socialist Party
Constitutional type: Devolved democratic system.
Head of State: Chancellor, elected by Delegates.
Head of Government: The Chancellor.
Legislature: Unicameral system (the Convention) - 50% (Representatives) elected by direct PR, 50% (Delegates) elected by modified FPTP.
Legislative power: Any legislation has to be passed by plebiscite.

Provincial Parties
As mentioned above, provincial parties all aim to achieve independence. They will also have the constitutional aims as above, however. They are named after the province they are founded in. eg Arpian Liberal Party.

Object of the Game.
Game Play.
Before Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
First National Elections.
Executive Turn.
Legislative Turn.
Conference Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Provincial Government.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
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Object of the Game

Postby rick.leeds » 07 May 2015, 17:13

1. To score 200 points and, having achieved that score, to be elected to two consecutive national governments.
2. To implement the party's constitutional plan and, having done so, to be elected to two consecutive national governments whilst under that system.
3. For provincial parties, to achieve independence and, having done so, to be elected to three consecutive national governments.

Introduction.
Game Play.
Before Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
First National Elections.
Executive Turn.
Legislative Turn.
Conference Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Provincial Government.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
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Game Play

Postby rick.leeds » 07 May 2015, 17:23

The game is played in years, with each year being split into four turns:

1. Executive turn
The government negotiate which areas of legislation it will attempt to pass based on the Issues. At the end of the stage, the player representing the Head of Government (HoG) will introduce 3 Bills based on these issues and may also introduce a Constitutional Bill. This will be for the National and Provincial governments, as applicable.

2. Legislative turn
Parliaments vote on the Bills. Any Bills passed may need to be recognised by further legislative processes, dependent on the constitution. This will be for the National and Provincial governments, as applicable.

3. Conference turn
Parties meet in national conferences. The players can try to change their party's political stance.

4. Campaign turn
Any elections take place.

At each phase, the GM will direct players as to which process is carried out first, provincial or national.

Introduction.
Object of the Game.
Before Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
First National Elections.
Executive Turn.
Legislative Turn.
Conference Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Provincial Government.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
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rick.leeds
 
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Before Play

Postby rick.leeds » 07 May 2015, 17:53

1. Choosing Parties
(a) Each player chooses a party. Players may choose to form a national party of a provincial party.
This will be by PM and the GM will keep the selections secret. Should two or more players choose the same party, the GM will randomly select one player to found this party and others will enter successive rounds of selection.

2. Choosing a Political Stance
Players will select the stance their party will take on the political issues.
There are 16 issues which are grouped into fours:
The Economy
- Economic Model: state, mixed or market.
- Taxation: targeted or universal; high, medium or low.*
- Investment: high, medium or low spending.
- Transport: nationalised, mixed or privatised.

Foreign Affairs
- Defence: high, medium or low spending.
- Foreign Relations: participatory, neutral or isolationist stance.
- Foreign Aid: high, medium or low spending.
- Immigration: open, qualified or closed policy.

Social Policy
- Health: state, mixed or private system.
- Education: state, mixed or private system.
- Welfare: high, medium or low spending.
- Policing: high, medium or low spending.

Industrial Policy
- Trade: free, mixed or protectionist policy.
- Research: high, medium or low spending.
- Energy: state, mixed or private system.
- Environment: positive, neutral or negative stance.

* Note on Taxation: Players must choose whether they will target the richest members of society or have a flat rate of taxation; they must also decide on the rate of taxation.

This will be by PM and the GM will keep the selections secret. There is no restriction as to what stance a party can take on any issue.

When all of these decisions have been made, the GM will publish the parties in play and the political stance of each party.


Introduction.
Object of the Game.
Game Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
First National Elections.
Executive Turn.
Legislative Turn.
Conference Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Provincial Government.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
User avatar
rick.leeds
 
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Constitutional Assembly

Postby rick.leeds » 07 May 2015, 18:49

Before the game proper can begin, the state constitution must be settled. This begins with the Constitutional Assembly.

The GM will set the Public Opinion level in each province for each aspect of the constitution. There are 4 aspects:
Polity - unity, federal, confederate.
Head of State - monarchy, directly elected, indirectly elected.
Head of Government - HoS, directly elected, indirectly elected.
Legislative process - liberal democratic, democratic.
Independence - united state or independent (only where a provincial party is in place).

This will then be translated by the GM into a provincial Party Affiliation Rating for each party in each province.
The process is:
1. The GM will generate Public Opinion for each aspect as a percentage.
2. This percentage will be equally split between any parties sharing that constitutional stance
3. The support for all aspects in each province are totaled for each party and divided by 4 (or 5 if provincial parties are involved). This will be the PAR for each party for each province.
4. The provincial PAR will then be changed into a national PAR for all parties. This will be based on the percentage of the population within each province:
Arpia: 18%
Briort: 12%
Dernia: 11%
Fav: 15%
Pegard: 13%
Severish: 17%
Tirsch: 14%.
5. These scores are then totaled to find the national PAR for all parties.

eg. In Arpia, there are 3 parties. The provincial PAR for each is:
Rep = 45%
Lib = 30%
Soc = 25%.
This is converted to a national PAR for Arpia, which has 18% of the population:
Rep = 8.2%
Lib = 5.4%
Soc = 4.5%.
The modified scores for each party from Arpia will be added to the modified PAR scores for all the other provinces to obtain each party's national PAR.

These scores will be used to find the make-up of the constitutional assembly.

The Constitutional Assembly will be unicameral.
- 50% of its make-up will be calculated directly on proportional representation. The PAR for each party will be converted into a percentage of 210 seats.
- 50% of its make-up will be calculated on a modified PAR (this is to represent a change in support for a nominal FPTP system). The process for this 50% will be:
1. In each province, the leading party will have 10% added to its PAR.
2. The smallest party will have 6% subtracted from it's PAR.
3. Other parties will equally share out the difference and subtract this from their PAR levels.

eg. Using the provincial PAR for Arpia above, the changes produce:
Rep = 55%
Lib = 26%
Soc = 19%.

4. Each province elects 70 additional MCAs.

The Constitutional Assembly will thereby be elected.

The players must now negotiate the constitution for the state. All MCAs representing a party will vote en bloc. Negotiations between players must focus on the different aspects of the constitution identified above: Polity, HoS, HoG and Legislative process. Players will try to get their favoured constitutional ideas through. Bargains can be done between players in secret.

The member with the largest number of MCAs will eventually present the GM with a constitutional model. This will be put to the vote of the Constitutional Assembly. Players will vote with the MCA power of all their MCAs.

Each aspect will be voted on separately. A simple majority will pass any aspect.

Any aspects that are not passed will then be proposed (after further negotiation) by the player representing the next largest bloc of MCAs and the process repeated. This continues until:
EITHER all aspects are passed,
OR the process is completed.

If any aspects are not passed, the player representing the largest bloc of MCAs will have a final chance. This player can propose any aspect, regardless of his party's constitutional stance. His bloc of MCAs will support it. The GM will then total other votes - any party which supports this aspect will automatically vote for it, any that oppose it will automatically vote against it; players will not have any say.

Should this process not complete the constitution, the GM will select other aspects based upon the closest voting preferences in the Constitutional Assembly.

The GM will then publish the constitution of the state and provinces.

Introduction.
Object of the Game.
Game Play.
Before Play.
First National Elections.
Executive Turn.
Legislative Turn.
Conference Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Provincial Government.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
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First National Elections.

Postby rick.leeds » 09 May 2015, 11:48

Once the state's constitution has been formed, the first National Elections will be held.

These will elect any of the following, based on the constitution:
- Head of State: (If directly elected) straight elections between any parties that enter. If no player achieves a majority, the top two will run-off.
- Head of Government: (If directly elected) as above.
- National legislature.
- Head of Province: (If directly elected) straight elections between any parties that enter. If no player achieves a majority, the top two will run-off.
- Head of Provincial Government: (If directly elected) as above.
- Provincial legislature.

See the Campaigning Turn for details of how elections are calculated.

Once the elections are over, governments are formed (including provincial governments). The GM will direct players on how this is to be organised. When the governments are formed, then the game proper begins.

Introduction.
Object of the Game.
Game Play.
Before Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
Executive Turn.
Legislative Turn.
Conference Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Provincial Government.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
User avatar
rick.leeds
 
Posts: 8360
Joined: 11 Jan 2009, 04:40
Location: Wherever I am, I'm scratching my head.
Class: Diplomat
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All-game rating: (1070)
Timezone: GMT

Executive Turn

Postby rick.leeds » 09 May 2015, 11:49

At this stage, the HoG (and HoPG) choose three issues to introduce legislation over. Constitutional legislation may also be introduced.

However, any legislation put forward by the HoG will need to be passed by the Legislature. This means that the HoG may need to negotiate with other players to choose legislation to propose.

Negotiations are led by the HoG over proposed legislation. These negotiations are unlimited. For instance, legislation may be partnered with other legislation, either in the same year or later in the game. In carrying out negotiations, players should keep in mind the legislative process described below.

When the deadline is reached, the HoG must nominate up to three political issues to address and up to one constitutional aspect.

This proposed legislation is called a Bill.

eg. An HoG may wish to change the way the state deals with Foreign Aid, deciding to set spending at a HIGH level. The HoG would publish this legislation as a Bill to Increase Foreign Aid to High Level.

Once Bills are published, the Legislative turn begins.

Introduction.
Object of the Game.
Game Play.
Before Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
First National Elections.
Legislative Turn.
Conference Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Provincial Government.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
User avatar
rick.leeds
 
Posts: 8360
Joined: 11 Jan 2009, 04:40
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Class: Diplomat
Standard rating: (1158)
All-game rating: (1070)
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Legislative Turn

Postby rick.leeds » 09 May 2015, 11:49

State and Provincial legislatures consider the Bills in the order they are published. This is when the legislature votes on the proposed legislation, either passing the Bill into Law or voting the Bills down.

State Legislative Process
1.a. Unicameral legislature.
The Bill is presented to the house. It passes if a simple majority support it and fails is a simple majority vote the Bill down.
1.b. Bicameral legislature.
The Bill is presented to the lower house first, then the upper house. The GM will direct this.

2.a. Houses elected by PR.
Players vote with the full bloc of their members.
2.b. Houses formed by delegates or FPTP.
Players vote with the full bloc of their members UNLESS the player chooses to vote AGAINST the party's political stance; eg if a party's political stance is to keep Foreign Aid spending low, but the player supports a Bill to have HIGH Foreign Aid spending.
If a player decides to support or oppose legislation against the party line, this will affect the number of votes he can control.

3. There is some leeway for players on their voting choices dependent upon their party line:
a. The HoG's party will automatically support any legislation which is within one degree of the party line.
b. Any party ALLIED to the HoG's party will do the same (Alliances are explained in Other Factors).
c. Any party in a government COALITION has a choice on whether to support the HoG's party on ISSUES. If this is outside one degree of the party line, some votes may be affected in a house formed by delegates or FPTP. However, choosing to NOT support the HoG's party moves the the Coalition towards breaking point.
d. Any party in a government COALITION has a choice on whether to support the HoG's party on CONSTITUTIONAL Bills. Constitutional votes do not carry the support of Coalition parties as an expectation.
e. Opposition parties will either vote against the Bill or abstain. Abstentions are when the opposition party decides it wants to pass the legislation; opposition parties NEVER support a majority government.
f. In the case of a minority government - when the government doesn't command a majority in a house - the opposition is allowed to oppose, abstain of support the Bill. Support will reduce the voting strength of the party in a house made up of delegates or FPTP members.

4. Voting is also modified in a house which is made up of delegates or FPTP members.
a. The HoG's party will fully support any legislation which moves policy towards the party line.
b. Any ALLIED party will support the legislation but, if this moves policy away from the party line, the vote will be split.
c. Any COALITION party reacts as at 3.c. above.
d. Opposition parties will have their vote split if an abstention or (in the case of a minority government) support moves policy away from a party line.

5. For a Bill to become an Act (and therefore set policy) it must pass all votes in houses.
a. If it fails in either house, the HoG may propose the same legislation again to an upper house.
b. If this second proposal passes the upper house, then the lower house will vote in this way:
- the HoG's party, any ALLIED party and any coalition party will automatically support the Bill en bloc;
- the opposition parties will also vote en bloc - to either oppose or abstain only.
c. If a Bill is not passed by either both houses on a first proposal, it fails; if either house fails a Bill on a second proposal, it fails.

6. In any democratic constitution, any Bills passed by the legislature must be passed by plebiscite. This will take place during the Conference turn and is explained below. ALL Constitutional Bills must be passed by plebiscite.

7. If Provincial governments don't have the ability to pass legislation on their own, then the national legislature will also vote on this legislation if the provincial legislative process passes it.

Any Bills which pass this legislative process become Acts and set the state policy.

Introduction.
Object of the Game.
Game Play.
Before Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
First National Elections.
Executive Turn.
Conference Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Provincial Government.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
User avatar
rick.leeds
 
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Conference Turn

Postby rick.leeds » 09 May 2015, 11:50

Public Opinion Phase
The GM will update the public opinion on all political issues. This will mostly be kept secret. However, public opinion will be published on each set of issues as a group - The Economy, Foreign Affairs, Social Policy and Industrial Policy. Parties will therefore be aware of trends within these sets.


Legislative Phase
If the constitution is democratic, then Plebiscites are voted on. This will be based on the issue's Public Opinion score but this will be modified by:
- the percentage of public opinion which matches the proposed policy will vote for.
- if the proposed policy is within one degree of public opinion, the vote will be split.
- if the proposed policy moves away from public opinion, the vote will be split,
- any other percentage of public opinion will vote against.
If a plebiscite result is for, the Bill becomes Law. If it is against, the Bill fails.

Party Stance Phase
Players may change the party stance on up to 2 issues per turn (never constitutional issues). However, the party stance can only be shifted by one degree each parliament; eg. if the party stance on Foreign Aid is low spending, it can be moved to medium spending only between General or National Elections.

Should a player try to shift the party stance twice in the life of a parliament, or if a player tries to shift the stance more than one degree, this will run the risk of a party split. Should this happen, a new party will form. This party will adopt the original party stance as created by the player.

This will affect members elected by FPTP. Some will split from the original party to form the new party. Some may also leave the party to join another, established party which has a the same party stance on the issue which caused the split IF that party has a similar constitutional stance - is also a unity, federal or confederate party. The percentage of members who split from the player's party will be determined randomly by the GM.

Players may also end a Coalition agreement during this phase.

Introduction.
Object of the Game.
Game Play.
Before Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
First National Elections.
Executive Turn.
Legislative Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Provincial Government.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
User avatar
rick.leeds
 
Posts: 8360
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Timezone: GMT

Campaigning Turn

Postby rick.leeds » 09 May 2015, 11:54

This is when elections are held, if any are due.

There are three ways elections may be held:
1. By-elections: if any member of an FPTP elected house dies or resigns, then that member must be replaced at a by-election.
2. Any legislative body which is due for re-election.
3. A HoG may call an election if a coalition has collapsed and the HoG heads a minority government. This is only possible for legislative bodies elected by FPTP, however, as other legislative bodies are fixed term.

Terms for legislative bodies.
1. Any legislative body elected by PR or formed by delegates is elected on a fixed term of 4 years.
2. Any legislative body elected by FPTP has a maximum life of 4 years, but these are not fixed term.
3. HoS and HoP are elected every 5 years.
4. Directly elected HoG and HoPG are elected at the same time as the legislative body elected by PR.

Election Process
Elections are resolved using the following factors.
1. Party Affiliation Rating (PAR).
Based on public support for the constitutional stance of parties..

2. Policy Support Rating (PSR).
Based on public opinion support for the party stance on issues.

3. Leadership Factor or Personality Factor.
Leadership relates to HoS, directly elected HoG, HoP, directly elected HoPG and any PR elected legislative body.
Personality relates to a FPTP-elected legislative body.

4. Provincial Variation.
This applies to provincial elections for legislative bodies only. It counts for 10% of the whole.

National Elections
- PAR is calculated in each province. This is converted into a national percentage and aggregated for each party.
- PSR is based on national opinion polls. A party receives a score based on support for its stance on each issue. The percentage of public opinion for that stance is split proportionately - based on PAR - between all parties sharing that stance. The support for each issue is totaled for each party and divided by 16 (the number of issues).
- Leadership is calculated for each party. This is calculated separately for HoS, directly elected HoG and PR bodies.
- PAR scores 30% of the whole, PSR 40% and Leadership 30%.
- In HoS and directly elected HoG elections, if no party achieves a majority of the vote, the top two candidates run-off again. The PAR and PSR remains the same. The remainder of the vote will be split between the two based on the proportion of the Leadership factor.
- In FPTP elections, PAR and PSR scores remain the same. Personality is calculated for each candidate. PAR scores 35%, PSR 45% and Personality scores 20%. If no party achieves a majority of the vote, the top two candidates run-off again. The PAR and PSR remains the same. The remainder of the vote will be split between the two based on the proportion of the Leadership factor.

Provincial Elections
- Unmodified PAR is used.
- PSR is used.
- Leadership is calculated in each province.
- Provincial Factor is calculated.
- PAR scores 25%, PSR 35%, Leadership 30%, Provincial 10%.
- In HoP and directly elected HoPG elections, if no party achieves a majority of the vote, the top two candidates run-off again. The PAR, PSR and Personality Factor remains the same. The remainder of the vote will be split between the two based on the proportion of the Leadership factor.
- In FPTP elections, PAR, PSR and Provincial Factor scores remain the same. Personality is calculated for each candidate. PAR scores 30%, PSR 40%, Personality scores 20% and Provincial Factor scores 10%. If no party achieves a majority of the vote, the top two candidates run-off again. The PAR, PSR and Provincial Factor remains the same. The remainder of the vote will be split between the two based on the proportion of the Personality factor.

Introduction.
Object of the Game.
Game Play.
Before Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
First National Elections.
Executive Turn.
Legislative Turn.
Conference Turn.
Provincial Government.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
User avatar
rick.leeds
 
Posts: 8360
Joined: 11 Jan 2009, 04:40
Location: Wherever I am, I'm scratching my head.
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