(PbF Game) Party Politics: Rules

A game of politics.

Provincial Government

Postby rick.leeds » 09 May 2015, 11:55

Provincial governments follow the pattern of the national government.

Dependent on the constitution, provincial governments have different powers:

Unity state
Provincial governments can only make independent policy over Education, Police, Environment and Investment. Any other issues must be accepted by the national legislature.
On other issues, they can only move one degree away from national policy (or national public opinion if no national policy exists).

Federal state
As above, except independent policy can be set over Health, Education, Welfare, Police, Research, Environment and Investment.

Devolved system
Independent policy can be set over Health, Education, Welfare, Police, Research, Environment and Investment and policy can vary by any degree from national policy.

Confederate state
As in a devolved system but also able to hold an independence plebiscite without reference to national legislature.

Introduction.
Object of the Game.
Game Play.
Before Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
First National Elections.
Executive Turn.
Legislative Turn.
Conference Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Additional Factors.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
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Additional Factors

Postby rick.leeds » 09 May 2015, 11:55

1. New Parties
If a party split produces a new party it will be run by the GM. However, new players may enter the game to run the party.
When under the control of the GM, it will participate in elections and vote but votes will be cast automatically on its policies. It cannot form a coalition.

2. Alliance
Players may form an alliance between parties who share a common constitutional type during the Conference turn. The Alliance, once formed, will last until the next fixed term elections.
The players will vote the same way and may negotiate between each other on how they will vote. Should no agreement be reached, however, the leader of the largest party (based on PR support) will decide the vote.
Allied parties will stand as if they had an electoral pact in elections and will represent a single political unity.

3. Coalition
Coalitions can only be formed after an election to obtain a stronger government.
Coalition parties may decide to use an electoral pact in elections.
There are no restrictions on which parties may form a coalition.

4. Electoral Pacts
Parties which share a constitutional type, or share at least the same party stance on 50% of the issues, may agree an electoral pact during the Conference turn. This means that they will agree to not stand against each other in FPTP and Hos, HoP, HoG or HoPG elections.

5. Elimination
If party will be eliminated if EITHER:
- it is not represented in a PR-elected chamber in two consecutive elections, OR
- it fails to be represented in either house of a legislature.

If the party is a national party and it is eliminated from a national legislature, it will be treated as if it were a bankrupt party (see Political Events).
If the party is a national party and it is eliminated from a provincial legislature, it will continue to run in other provinces.
If the party is a provincial party, it will be treated as if it were a bankrupt provincial party.

An eliminated player may:
1. Start a new provincial party, starting from scratch.
2. Take control of any party being maintained by a GM.
3. Leave the game.

6. Independence
Any party created by a player as a provincial party is a pro-independence party regardless of what other stances it takes. If such a party becomes the largest party in a provincial government, they are free to try to hold a provincial plebiscite, depending upon the freedom to do so in the constitution:
- If the constitution is devolved the party must be able to secure support in legislation to hold a plebiscite.
- If the constitution is democratic a plebiscite may be held in the Campaigning turn.
- In any other constitution, the national legislature must allow the plebiscite.

In each province there will be an extra opinion poll on independence. This will affect the reactions if a provincial party's legislature for a plebiscite fails. In this case, if public opinion is For independence than any party that voted against the plebiscite legislation will lose up to 10% support in the province. This support will be split:
- 50% will be transferred to the provincial party;
- 50% will be shared proportionately, based on PAR, between every other party that supported the plebiscite.
This will continue in every election in the province up to and including the next General Election.

Plebiscite
Should a plebiscite be allowed, it will be calculated upon:
- PAR being calculated for the parties and those that support independence will be totaled and those opposing it totaled. These scores will count at 40% of the plebiscite result.
- The public opinion score for and against will be calculated as 60% of the result.
These two scores will be totaled to to find the final vote for or against independence.
In a plebiscite, a simple majority will decide the vote.
Should a province achieve independence it will be run as if it were a separate nation. It will remain in the game and all political actions will be scored as for the national state.

Referendum
Should a plebiscite be denied, the provincial party may choose to hold a referendum instead. This will be carried out exactly as if it were a plebiscite. However, a referendum has no legislative power and, regardless of result, no legislation can be carried forward from it.

A referendum result will affect the independence penalty described above for parties if a plebiscite is denied. In this case, if the result of the referendum is pro-independence, the penalty will be doubled against those parties. If the result or the referendum is anti-independence, however, there will be no penalty.

Because of this, a referendum may be organised by either the provincial party instead of a plebiscite OR by the national legislature.

Introduction.
Object of the Game.
Game Play.
Before Play.
Constitutional Assembly.
First National Elections.
Executive Turn.
Legislative Turn.
Conference Turn.
Campaigning Turn.
Provincial Government.
Political Developments.
Scoring.
World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
User avatar
rick.leeds
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Posts: 8360
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Political Developments

Postby rick.leeds » 09 May 2015, 11:55

World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
User avatar
rick.leeds
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8360
Joined: 11 Jan 2009, 04:40
Location: Wherever I am, I'm scratching my head.
Class: Diplomat
Standard rating: (1158)
All-game rating: (1070)
Timezone: GMT

Scoring

Postby rick.leeds » 09 May 2015, 11:56

World Diplomacy Forum.
Online Resources editor at the Diplomatic Pouch.
Don't let the stepladder get you. Watch where you're stepping. ANY step could be a doozy.
User avatar
rick.leeds
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8360
Joined: 11 Jan 2009, 04:40
Location: Wherever I am, I'm scratching my head.
Class: Diplomat
Standard rating: (1158)
All-game rating: (1070)
Timezone: GMT

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